Akash Ganga Homestay

Akash Ganga Homestay

Akash Ganga

Nestled at an altitude of 1808 metres and surrounded by snow capped mountains, this NOM homestay is named after a nearby river - Akash Ganga.
Starts from Rs 1200/ Night

Nestled at an altitude of 1808 metres and surrounded by snow capped mountains, this NOM homestay is named after a nearby river - Akash Ganga. The host, Ranaji, believes Akash Ganga is the perfect name for his home because it has a similar essence. The roof of the house is made up of stones which are replaced every few years. To the left of the house are terrace gardens and to the right is a dense forest that has monkeys tumbling around the property. The overall view from the property is majestic with a layer of lofty mountains blanketed by clouds.

Akash Ganga is a homestay built by the Rana family’s forefather. The property is about 65 years old and happens to be the oldest in the village - covered with mud and stones, and plastered with gobar (cow dung). The house has three traditionally designed rooms with a mesmerizing view from the terrace. The wooden doors and traditional locks are perfectly preserved. The kitchen has little dining corner, a jyeti (a utensil with boiling water) is continuously running to keep warm. The property has both Indian and western style toilets with no shower panel. The hosts provide you with hot water all through the day for drinking, washing, and bathing. All basic amenities are made available at the stay. The village also has a couple of kirana shops.

Garhwali meals are healthy, with a balanced use of fats; ghee to temper lentils, mustard oil for greens and vegetable oil for other dishes. Spices used are minimal. Garlic, ginger, chillies, asafoetida are favoured. A few local indigenous spices make Garhwali food distinctive. Bhang (hemp) and bhang jeera seeds are also used in some dishes and chutneys.
Akash Ganga Homestay provides you with two complimentary meals a day, two meals of your choice. The meals mostly consist of homegrown crops and vegetables. The property has a garden in the backyard where the family grows santra, mosambi, pahadi kakri, and apples seasonally. Almost everything the family consumes and offers is from their own produce.

Ever woken up to a snow capped view of the mountains, in a cosy warm hut? Or lived in an organic and sustainable surrounding? This lesser known village in the interiors of Garhwal lets you dive into the earthy experiences of the terrain. From the village are treks to Devratal, Chopta-Tungnath, Chandrasheela, and Madhyamaheshwar. Apart from all the walking and hiking around the village, you could also engage in activities such as bird-watching, fishing, and organic farming. Learning the beautiful Garhwali dialect is always an option. Surrounded by mountains on all sides, Akash Ganga provides you with a warm and welcoming stay designed with basic living conditions.

By Bus: The convenient and cheapest way to reach the village is via Rishikesh. Every day, there are regular buses which ply from Kashmere Gate, New Delhi to Rishikesh. From Rishikesh, you get a bus till Rudraprayag where you get another bus for Ukhimath. The homestay is about 15 minutes from here, you can ask the host to pick you up.
By Air: The fastest way to reach Ukhimath is to reach Dehradun by flight, and then take a bus till there. You could also get a cab from Dehradun to Ukhimath. Ukhimath is about 222 kilometres from Dehradun which takes 7-8 hours to reach there.

Ashish Ranaji’s grandfather built the house. The family has 6-7 members who primarily are farmers, but they also own a wedding business. Ranaji’s wife is a cook at the community school. The wife also fetches wood for cooking and grass for the cattle. Both Ranaji and his wife collectively carry out all the household chores together. The couple takes pride in being able to serve the people and tries to comfort their guests in every possible way. Ranaji is a man of traditions and follows in the footsteps of his ancestors.

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