Ghi Skith House

Ghi Skith House

Near Kharsha

Westeros of Zanskar, this is the place where White Walker would climb the Wall.
Closed for Winter

From a distance, village, gompa and mountainside looks fused together, . . . It was a medieval world. Lamas of all ages gossiped and giggled, lounging on the steps in front of heavy wooden doors with iron studs. In the evening sun the angles of the roof and squared lintels cast black-and-white shadows in geometrical patterns. Mastiffs still sheltering from the day's heat stretched out in shady corners squalid with gompa debris - old bones, pieces of cloth, and the odd tattered boot. Despite the midsummer warmth the old lamas' maroon cloaks were of heavy tweed. The cheeky, shaven-headed boys wore their cotton cloaks slipped off one shoulder and their yellow hats at a rakish angle. A bearskin hung above the door into the main shrine, its massive head loured from above as though it might at any minute bare its fangs.Lamas wearing red and yellow robes and brocade hats sat in lines to chant the evening prayers. The last rays of the sun glinted off the gold brocade in the altar cloth and off the rows of thankas. Images of the Buddha, three times the size of man, stood above the altar, dominating the theatrical scene. Trumpets blasted, cymbals clashed and conch shells were blown through cupped hands, the sound escaped through the closed windows and curtained doorways into the courtyards and out across the valley.

This is Kharsha for you.
Across the valley from Padum, Karsha is Zanskar’s most striking village, full of photogenic old-fashioned homes, barley fields and threshing circles worked by dzo (yak-cow half breeds). Staying here is the best possible way to witness the Zanskari Culture.Rising directly above is a near-vertical red rock mountainside, sliced in half by a deep chasm. Whitewashed monastic buildings cascading down one side form Zanskar's biggest Buddhist monastery complex, with an upper prayer hall that contains the mummified body of its 14th-century founder. Climbing the other side of the chasm is a Buddhist nunnery, an ancient citadel site and a remarkable yet little-visited Alchi-style temple featuring a splendid 11th-century carved figure.

Ghi-skith House is home to a royal family of Kharsha. So beware of royal treatment.

Ghi-skith House is home to a royal family of Kharsha. From the pathway to the bedroom everything is royal, you get to know from the design of the house. The house is a gem of a location, on right-hand side rises the 1000 years old Kharsha Monastery and left-hand side the view of might Zanskar ranges.

As soon you open the lush green backward full of organic crops welcome you. Here you can sit in the afternoon soaking the UV rays as you see Kharsha rise from the red mountains just like Game of Thrones scene. Inside there are 2 big rooms where guest can retire, the drawing is made of carved wood and Persian carpets. The rooms are naturally lit by the multiple windows which allow you a view of Zanskar all the time and reminds you that you are here in heaven. The dinning area is a typical ladakhi style which makes the food even more filling.

Simple home cooked Ladakhi food is served. Here the welcoming foods are apricot(fresh fro Kashmir) and dry fruits(fresh from Baltistan). From tradition firewood Dal Chawal to Mom Mok. Please don’t expect any fancy food as this is not being served here. You can also participate in cooking and learn some recipes from Ladakh.

Step into the shoes of a Royal family and see how life unfolds in Kharsha. Take the village walk and see the history unfolding. The most important thing to experience as soon you reach Khrsha is to visit the great Kharsha Monastery made in 950AD.

Karsha is the largest and most important monastery in Zanskar. It is attributed to Padmasambhava, and there are ancient rock-carvings at the site.

In order to reach Karsha Gompa, one has to travel a 9 kilometer long road, across an iron bridge built over the Stod river. It can also be accessed through the Tungri bridgehead alongside a 17 kilometer link road that separates from the Kargil-Padum road at Tungri.

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