Rann Visamo

Rann Visamo

The resort has incorporated traditional Pakistani architecture in its Bhungas and cottages owing to the Bharmal family’s roots.
Starts from Rs 2000/ Night

Gaganbhai Bharmal’s family used to get a lot of visitors who’d want to interact with his uncle: who’s won a national award for his Leather work. In an attempt to provide a comfortable stay for these visitors while simultaneously building something that’d be an asset to his offspring, he established the beautiful Rann Visamo resort in 2014 with the support of his family. The resort has incorporated traditional Pakistani architecture in its Bhungas and cottages owing to the Bharmal family’s roots. Their extensive involvement in Kutchchi mud work has lent to the beautification of both the exteriors and interiors. The tents also come with mud work aplenty, which gives a far more traditional feel to even, even amidst the standard comfort design and interior. The dining area too, is stunning with a colourful roof weaved together with cloths of a pleasant colour palette. Come here for a clear view of the sky, which neatly placed cottages, tents and Bhungas around a large open space; or to interact with the lovely Kora, the daughter of Gaganbhai who’s a talented bead-work artist, and a lovely, boisterous little lady who guests often bond with so easily that they’d think twice before leaving the property.

Rann Visamo begins at a beautifully designed reception and dining area: the roof of which is made by stitching together several local prints in the colour pink, green and yellow. It is thoughtfully designed so there is ample of open ground for a cultural program, a stroll or even for kids to run around, and the rooms are pushed to the edges to optimise the vast ground. Guests have the options of staying in tents, family cottages or the traditional Bhungas. The five cottages come with a double bed with two seating chairs and a table where one can enjoy a cup of tea or the Kutchchi chachch; and an attached big attached bathroom with a shower and hot water availability. The cottages are build next to each other for a family to live in close proximity. These are modern rectangular in design and come with modern bathroom facilities, even though the interiors otherwise have retained a traditional touch. The beds are made with organic materials, and the entire room is replete with artistic wall paintings that not only optimise ethnic kutchi artwork but also provides a livelihood to the local artist every year during renovations. The cottages also come with a seating next to the window, overlooking the common grounds. The Bhungas are traditional kutchi houses designed in a circular manner, thick walls made from mud and gobar, with a thatched roof, to insulted the room in a way that its cool during the summer and warm and cosy during the cold winters of Kutch. Rann Visamo has 5 bhungas, scattered in the left side of the property and offers a tad bit more privacy. All come with an attached bathroom and privision for hot water and a shower.

The resort offers a gujarati thali for lunch, comprising of savoury (not sweet) dal, bhaat, 2 sabzis, roti,a sweet and a savoury achar, gud with ghee and another sweet dish. For dinner, we have a kutchi thali with kadi, khichidi, bajre ka rotla, sabzi, locally sourced traditional achar (pickle), papad, with gud and ghee and another local desert. The food is mindfully cooked with minimum oil and the dal is savoury, almost spicy, like the north Indian dal, as the staff recognises that the sweet gujarati dal may not suit everyone’s preferences. Parathas, upma, poha, pakoda, bread, butter and honey are some of the breakfast options with hot masala chai or coffee and fruits.

The vast open space at the property serves as a playground for number of kids and their giggles. Rann Visamo also puts up a stall managed by Kora, Gaganbhai’s daughter, and her cousins, who put in hours of intricate work every day into making bead jewellery and embroidered items with their own hands! Exchange questions with the ever curious and sweet Kora as you go through all the products you could take back home with you as souvenirs for your kith and kin. The ground also offers warmth around a bonfire, which also doubles as a stage for local cultural events of songs and dance, with prior request. One can make the most of this open space to star-gaze to their heart’s content. The host would gladly take the travellers home so they could watch all the efforts that go into making this jewellery, and perhaps learn the artwork, too.

By train: The nearest railway station is Bhuj, from where you can take chakra to the bus station. The 2 hours long bus journey to ‘Khavda’ is the cheapest option, with less than Rs.100 for the fare. The frequency is at 3-4 buses a day, for Khavda, and hourly for a nearby village called Bhirandiyara. Another option is a direct bus to Hodka village (which you’ll have to pre-book), but the frequency of these buses only increase with the peak of the Rann Utsav.You can request the host for a pickup from either of these village bus stops. The easiest, most hassle free way to get here is by hiring a chakra or a car, which will drop you at the stay, for a price of Rs.2000-Rs.3500, subjective to the vehicle and the season.
By air: The nearest airport to the village stay is Bhuj. From here you could take an auto or a chakra to the stay or follow the instructions as mentioned above.

Gaganbhai says his first love will always be leather work and handicraft. It’s something that sustained him and generations of his family before him and it’s going to be passed down to his children, too. He’s been a part of several mud-work projects around the country and if you sit for a talk with him, the quiet, smiling man will tell you all the places he’s been to, on the map. He started RannVisamo so he could provide a good place for all the tourists coming in for Rann Utsav, and every little wall painting and the detailing speaks for his hard work.

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